'Bite' could be costly for Suarez' career

By sportsnewsarena correspondent
Jun 25, 2014
  • Luis Suarez.(Photo:FIFA)

Luis Suarez could face a lengthy ban that would force him to miss the rest of the World Cup if found guilty of biting Italy's Giorgio Chiellini. Fifa, football's governing body, opened disciplinary proceedings after Uruguay's 1-0 win on Tuesday and has requested television footage.

Chiellini claimed Suarez bit him on the left shoulder, but Suarez said the defender "bumped" into him.Suarez, 27, could be banned for up to 24 matches or two years. Fifa said in a statement:

"The player has the right to be heard and has until (11pm Kenyan time) to submit all documentation.

"The disciplinary committee does not yet have all the elements to discuss the matter. We cannot speak about what could potentially happen. This is in the hands of the disciplinary committee.

"The body pronouncing the sanction decides the scope and duration of it - so we really cannot anticipate what could or could not happen and that's all we can actually say.

"The disciplinary committee understands the urgency of the matter because Uruguay are still in the competition."

The longest ban in World Cup history is eight games, handed out in 1994 to Italy defender Mauro Tassotti for breaking Spain's Luis Enrique's nose with his elbow during the second half of their quarter-final.

Uruguay face Colombia in the last 16 on Saturday after finishing second in Group D behind Costa Rica. Suarez's actions have already received widespread condemnation.

The Liverpool forward was given a 10-game ban for biting Chelsea's Branislav Ivanovic's arm during a Premier League match in April 2013.

He was also suspended for seven games for biting PSV Eindhoven's Otman Bakkal's shoulder while Ajax captain in 2010.

In December 2011, Suarez was also given an eight-match suspension and fined £40,000(about Ksh.6) for racially abusing Manchester United's Patrice Evra. After the Ivanovic incident, Liverpool said they had spoken to Suarez about his "unacceptable" behaviour.

BBC